Attitude of Gratitude

Attitude of Gratitude

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I have been thinking a lot this week about gratitude and how I just feel better when I embrace the attitude of gratitude. Don’t you notice it? Life just goes smoother when we notice the good going on around us.

I think this goes beyond the question at the Thanksgiving table, “What are you thankful for?” It is the daily focus of what do I have to be grateful NOW.Consider this as we enter into another part of our Holiday Trifecta journey this year. If you have not heard me talk about the Holiday Trifecta and how it can have a negative impact on us (and our eating), I suggest you look at my blog.

This week I talked on my Feed Your Soul with Kim Podcast about
Gratitude Practice. I want to be in the flow of gratitude more often than not. Want to join me?Check out this week’s podcast and get some inspiration for your own Gratitude Practice. I invite you to have a listen on the Feed Your Soul with Kim Podcast.

Episode 29 – Gratitude Practice

  • 3 reasons gratitude is important.
  • 3 problems that occur when we do not focus on gratitude.
  • 3 positive outcomes you can anticipate from being in gratitude more often.

The Feed Your Soul with Kim Podcast is available on your favorite podcast platform including:

IHeart: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-feed-your-soul-with-kim-45912016/

These podcasts are quick (usually no more than 30 minutes) and each gives you a doable at the end to feel like you really accomplished something.

End Emotional Eating

Kim McLaughlin M.A. is a counselor and a motivational coach working with people who engage in emotional eating or binge eating. She is a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor. If you are in need of services contact Kim McLaughlin here.

Kim is the author of the best-selling book Feed Your Soul; Nourish Your Life! A Six Step System to Peace with Food. Learn more about her book here.

Kim McLaughlin has been identified as writing one of the Top 50 Blogs about Emotional Eating by the Institute on Emotional Eating. Sign up for her free Special Report: Top Strategies to End Binge Eating here or visit her website at www.FeedYourSoulTherapy.com.

What is Stress Eating?

What is Stress Eating?

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I have been feeling overloaded lately and I have been turning to my wellness tools to deal with the feelings. Stress eating can be the way to handle feeling overloaded, especially over the holidays. It seems to show up a lot this time of year, so I dedicated the 2 most recent podcasts on stress eating.

I invite you to have a listen on the Feed Your Soul with Kim Podcast and get a handle on the stress, so it does not turn into overeating.

Episode 27 – What is Stress Eating?

In this podcast we discuss:

  • What is stress eating?
  • How stress eating makes your stress worse.
  • Come away ways to manage stress differently.

 

Episode 28- Beat Holiday Stress

  • What are the 7 causes of holiday stress?
  • Learn the 7 stress busters that will get you into action now.
  • Come away with a doable to start this week to lessen stress this holiday.

The Feed Your Soul with Kim Podcast is available on our favorite podcast platform including:

IHeart: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-feed-your-soul-with-kim-45912016/

These podcasts are quick (usually no more than 30 minutes) and each gives you a doable at the end to
feel like you really accomplished something.

End Emotional Eating

Kim McLaughlin M.A. is a counselor and a motivational coach working with people who engage in emotional eating or binge eating. She is a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor. If you are in need of services contact Kim McLaughlin here.

Kim is the author of the best-selling book Feed Your Soul; Nourish Your Life! A Six Step System to Peace with Food. Learn more about her book here.

Kim McLaughlin has been identified as writing one of the Top 50 Blogs about Emotional Eating by the Institute on Emotional Eating. Sign up for her free Special Report: Top Strategies to End Binge Eating here or visit her website at www.FeedYourSoulTherapy.com.

Overeating Halloween Candy: Have Peace with Food

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Are you overeating Halloween Candy?

Are you afraid to have it in the house because you will overeat it?

Do you wish you did not have to worry about candy?

I have been hearing for weeks that people have bought their BAGS of Halloween candy and have eaten it all!

Overeating Halloween Candy

Has this happened to you?

Possibly you have not bought the candy yet, because you are afraid you will eat it all. I know… you wait until Halloween to buy it, but end up eating way more than you want or you eat (sneak) your kid’s candy.

I have had a love/hate relationship with Halloween and all the candy that goes along with it.

I understand this dilemma, because I used to spend Halloween evening at the gym to avoid buying the candy and worrying that I would eat it all. I was scared of Halloween candy, not the scary costumes!

I decided that I had to make peace with food and especially with candy since my husband and daughter love Halloween: they Trick or Treat while I pass out the candy. I have written about my struggle with Halloween candy on my blogs and will talk about it more on my Feed Your Soul with Kim Podcast.

An idea yesterday that I would make available to all of you (and anyone else who signs up) for my  FREE Overeating Halloween Candy: Have Peace with Food video series going over how to have peace with Halloween candy.

Here is what you get:
  • A 6 video series that is short and gives you what you need to deal with Halloween candy.
  • Powerful take aways from the videos as well as doables to get you into action.
  • All of this is my gift to  you when you sign up.

I know  you want peace with food/candy this Halloween.

All you have to do is sign up and the link to the video series will be sent you.

End Emotional Eating

I hope you sign up below.

Peace,
Kim

Ending Emotional Eating: Leftover Halloween candy

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Ending Emotional Eating: Leftover Halloween candy

I just saw a video from Jimmy Kimmel of an annual prank where he encourages parents to video themselves telling their kids that they ate all of the kids Halloween candy. I must admit it was funny to see the kids have such expressive (sad, mad) reactions. It also made me think of the torment some of us experience after the kids go Trick or Treating and now we are faced with lots of candy in the house or left over candy bought to give out to the kids. This situation can be really difficult for anyone with emotional eating issues. Just having the candy in the house can lead to overeating, obsessive thoughts (“do I eat it or don’t I”) and wondering how we can hide that we ate the candy.

Emotional eating means we eat to help ourselves deal with emotions, and some emotions can revolve around the fear of having candy in the house. We can become sneaky and shame ridden when we do eat someone else’s Halloween candy or eat more than we think we should. When I was a child, I remember taking some of my brothers Halloween candy. He would ask who took it and I did not tell the truth. He then started to count the candy and then I could not keep taking it without being caught. I felt ashamed that I engaged in that kind of behavior and did not tell the truth about it.

I consider Halloween as the start of the holiday season, which can be very challenging for emotional eaters. Sugar can often be the go to choice when emotions arise. Now we are done with Halloween, but not with the candy. There is a full bowl of it in my house and it is now not a concern for me. If you struggle with this like I have (read more on my Halloween story here), let me give you some tips to get through it.

  1. I like to tell myself, “It is not mine to take or eat.” That thought keeps me out of my child’s candy. Think up a statement that you will tell yourself which can help redirect you or use mine.
  2. Do you really need that much candy in the house? Local dentists collect (and sometimes pay for) candy which they send to the troops. Engage your child (if it is their candy) in the idea we have plenty and we can share or make it a rule that we only keep a certain amount and the rest we give away. It is nice to give others a sweet treat.
  3. Ask yourself why you really want the candy. Sounds simple, but some moments of questioning ourselves, our feelings, and our desire to have the candy can help use become more mindful of our decisions.

These tips can be very effective in the short term process of managing the thoughts and behaviors around sweets. Since this is the start of the holiday season, really consider a plan of action for yourself for the next 2 months. Developing an understanding of your emotional eating and a plan of action is a great way to start the holidays. It is possible to have an enjoyable holiday without the struggle over food.

Have some tips about how you handle leftover Halloween candy? Let us know in the comments below.

Kim McLaughlin, MA is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist who specializes in helping people with eating issues and eating disorders.  If you are concerned that about overeating, weight or your use of food in general please contact her here. Sign up for her FREE Top Tips to End Emotional Eating here. Check out her website at www.FeedYourSoulTherapy.com.

End Worrying About Your Child’s Weight and Overeating

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmailMany parents are concerned about their child’s eating or their child’s weight. There are statistics that 1 in 3 kids are overweight or obese. It is a different world today than when many of us were kids. There is less activity: kids are spending a lot of time on the internet, on their phones, or playing video games. We all seem to be under more stress and pressure, including our kids. In addition, we do not always eat in the healthiest manner for many reasons (stress, time, or finances).

There was a study of kids aged 5-10 who had been classified as overweight or obese and had been referred to a clinic for treatment by their pediatricians. The study found that the majority of parents (93.5%) recognized their child was overweight or obese, but 30% said they did not see their child’s weight as a problem, and they had not made any changes in the child’s lifestyle or eating. So, it can be tough to take action around food issues even when we know there is a problem.

I know you have the best interest of your child in mind, and dealing with food, weight and overeating can be tough to manage.

Do you wonder if your child has issues with food or their weight? Here are some common warning signs:

  1. Your child has gained a significant amount of weight (more than would be expected given growth spurts) and their clothes are not fitting.
  2. Your child is being teased for their weight.
  3. Your child hides, sneaks or is overly focused on food.
  4. Your child would rather spend their time on the computer, texting, playing video games or watching television rather than being active or with others.
  5. A family member or the pediatrician is concerned about your child’s weight.
  6. Your child is upset about their weight.

The starting spot is to recognize there is a problem and to take action. Here are some steps to take to address this issue:

  1. Listen carefully when your child discusses their weight and then ask them open ended questions (these are questions where they cannot answer with just a yes or no) about what they think and how they feel.
  2. Know that food issues can be related to emotions and feelings that your child is trying to manage through the use of food.
  3. Consider addressing any weight issues you have, so you do not unknowingly pass on your feelings about yourself.
  4. Look at how the family is behaving and address the issue more globally. If the kids eat lots of unhealthy snacks, maybe get everyone together to make some more healthy changes. If the family is not active, plan a family activity outside. Make video games and phone time a privilege with time limits. Declare the television be turned off during meal and snack time (time focused on electronic devices creates the opportunity for mindless eating).
  5. Meet with your pediatrician, nutritionist, or counselor who can help you get to a healthier lifestyle.  Be sure to look for someone who specializes in eating issues.

As a parent it can be tough to address your child’s food and weight issues. You might feel concerned about your child’s potential immediate or future health risks or even their quality of life. I highly suggest you refrain from any negative comments about your child’s weight or body, as this only makes them want to eat more to comfort themselves. Lastly, refrain from putting your child on a restrictive diet. Restrictive diets set kids up for overeating and even more secretiveness and obsessive behavior with food.

If you are concerned about your child, know there is help in terms of information and professionals who specialize in eating issues. You are not alone. Become aware of the many strategies to deal with kids and food issues and reach out for help, as necessary. Addressing your child’s food issues now will set them up for success in their future. They will learn that food is nutrition to fuel their bodies and promote healthy activity and a better body image.

Kim McLaughlin, MA is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist who specializes in helping people with eating issues and eating disorders.  If you are concerned that about overeating, weight or your use of food in general please contact her here. Sign up for her FREE Top Tips to End Emotional Eating here. Check out her website at www.FeedYourSoulTherapy.com.